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Category Archives: Aloha Lily (Eucomis Hybrid)

Planting Pineapple Lily Bulbs

Tuesday, August 4th, 2015

planting pineapple lil

Planting Pineapple Lily Bulbs

Aloha Lily, more commonly known as a pineapple lily, makes a beautiful potted plant, as well as a landscape plant. Pineapple lilies are easy to grow, drought tolerant, deer and rodent resistant and requires very little care! Planting pineapple lily bulbs can be done anytime of the year as long as hard frosts are not expected.

Botanical Name: Eucomis vandermerwei hybrid

Plant Family: Hyacinthaceae

Native To: South Africa

Exposure: Sun to part sun

Blooms: Late Spring, Summer & Fall

Garden Planting: Soil must drain well.  Plant pineapple lily bulbs 1″ (3 cm) deep from top of bulb and 10″ apart in the ground.  Starting at a warm temperature around 70° F (21° C) will advance growth for earlier blooming.  Although the bulb tolerates freezing weather quite well, the plant itself will die back.  As long as hard frosts are not expected, Pineapple Lily bulbs will do well outside.

Containers: Containers should be at least 6″ (15 cm) in diameter.  Commercial soil mix should be used.  Pour soil into the pot, about half full. Place the top of the bulb (pointy side) up in the container and fill the container the rest of the way, making sure the tip of the bulb is covered with approximately 1/2″ of soil. Be sure to leave 1/2″ of space between the top of the pot and the soil line for watering. Container can be placed in a greenhouse or bright window. Starting at a warm temperature around 70° F (21° C) will advance growth for earlier blooming.

Sunlight, Water & Fertilizer: Pineapple lily prefers full sun through midday, with some shade during hot afternoons.  During active growth, keep the soil moist, not soggy.  They don’t need much fertilizer and should be fertilized with full spectrum fertilizer at half the labeled rate.  It is best to irrigate with pure water every other watering to leach out salts which cause leaf burn.  Once established, Aloha Lily requires very little care since it is tolerant to neglect and drought resistant.

Dormancy: After blooming, pineapple lilies will continue to grow green foliage, storing energy for next year’s growth in the bulb.  With the onset of fall and shorter days, leaves will begin  to naturally turn yellow as the tuber begins its dormancy cycle. If possible, stop watering and allow the soil to dry.  If left in the ground, pineapple lily bulbs can handle moderate frosts, but it is best to mulch where the ground will freeze. However, bulbs that are planted in containers can rot and need to remain dry through the winter. To make sure the soil in the pot remains dry, you can place them against the eves of the house or in the garage for the winter. Then when spring comes around, you can place them back outside in the rain or water them as necessary. If the soil becomes bone dry, you can place the pot in a saucer with water. Pineapple lily bulbs can remain in the same pots for many years without re-potting, but you may add soil as needed.

Cold winters below 0°F (-15°C) USDA Zone 7: For best results, dig up the bulbs in the ground for winter. Keep the bulbs dry and protect them from freezing.  If planted in pots, it is okay to leave the tubers in the containers as long as the soil is dry. Store the pots in a dry, non-freezing area. You can replant the tubers or begin watering the pots the following spring after the last freeze.

Check out our available Pineapple Lily Bulbs:

New! Aloha Lily Kona

Aloha Lily Leia

Aloha Lily Maui

Aloha Lily Nani

Aloha Lily Leia Flower Fields

Friday, August 15th, 2014

Aloha Lily Leia Flower Fields

Aloha Lily Leia Flower Fields

Our Aloha Lily Leia Flower Fields are in full bloom during the month of July and early August. Here are some beautiful flower field photographs taken by the Aloha Lily breeder. Leia’s blooms are a stunning burgundy color that contrasts beautifully with the blue sky.

Aloha Lily Leia, flower photography

eucomis_field1  Aloha Lily Leia Flower Fields, beautiful flower field photographs Aloha Lily Leia, beautiful flower field photographs

 

Shop Aloha Lily Bulbs – On sale NOW!

When to Plant Aloha Lilies: Aloha Lily Planting Care Guide

Friday, June 20th, 2014

Looking for information on when to plant Aloha Lilies? June is the perfect time to plant Aloha Lilies, whether they are in containers or garden beds. See below for details on planting and caring for your beautiful aloha lilies. Still have questions? Give us a call today at 1-831-728-0500.

Planting Aloha Lilies

Planting: Aloha Lily Bulbs can be planted in either containers or garden beds. Aloha Lilies prefer deep, well-draining soil and are best-suited for medium pots 6”-8”, 1 gallon, or 2 gallon containers. For a fuller Aloha Lily, multiple bulbs can be planted in a container.

Lighting: Aloha Lilies prefers full sun. In hotter climates, Aloha Lily needs partial shade during the hottest part of the day.

Watering: Keep soil moist but not soggy.

Fertilizing: Any full spectrum fertilizer at standard rates will keep the plant healthy and green.

Warning: Over fertilizing may result in tipburn, which is where the leaves appear to be burned.

Dormancy: After blooming, Aloha Lilies will continue to grow green foliage in order to store energy in the bulb for next year’s growth. In the beginning of fall, leaves will begin to turn yellow as the tuber begins its dormancy cycle. At this time discontinue watering and allow for the soil to dry out.

aloha lily nani, aloha lily bulbs for sale, pink pineapple lily, fragrant pink pineapple lily, eucomis, hybrid eucomis

 

 

 

 

 

  • Bulbs in containers: Aloha Lily bulbs grown in containers can easily rot. It is important to keep the bulbs dry throughout the winter. You can prevent the bulb from rotting by placing the containers against the eves of the house or in the garage. Containers can be placed back outside during spring time.
  • Bulbs in ground: Aloha Lilies can handle moderate frost. It is best to mulch areas where the ground will freeze.

See chart below as a reference to what USDA zone you live in and how you should plant Aloha Lilies:

When to Plant Aloha Lilies

Bulbs in cold winters below USDA Zone 7:

  • Bulbs in ground: In areas where winters reach 10° F or colder dig up tubers. Keep bulbs dry in paper or mesh bags and protect them from freezing. Replant tubers in spring after the last freeze.
  • Bulbs in containers: It is ok to leave tubers in their pots if the soil is completely dry, store containers in a dry non-freezing area. Place containers outside and begin watering the pots the following spring after the last freeze.

Interested in purchasing quality Aloha Lily bulbs? Shop Now! Have questions about planting aloha lilies? Give us a call at 1-831-728-0500, we’re glad to help!

Aloha Lily Varieties Attract Butterflies

Tuesday, September 17th, 2013

Aloha Lily is known to attract bees and other pollinators. Our eucomis hybrid varieties also attract butterflies. Here are photos of Aloha Lily varieties with beautiful orange butterflies.

Aloha Lily® Aloha Lily® and butterflyAloha Lily® Varieties Attracts Butterflies

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Aloha Lily Care

Wednesday, August 7th, 2013

Eucomis Planting and Care

Planting: Bulbs can be planted in either containers or garden beds. Aloha Lilies prefer deep, well-draining soil. Aloha Lily bulbs are best-suited for medium pots 6”-8”, 1 gallon, or 2 gallon containers. For a fuller Aloha Lily, multiple bulbs can be planted in a container.

Lighting: Aloha Lily prefers full sun. In hotter climates, Aloha Lily needs partial shade during the hottest part of the day.

Watering: Keep soil moist but not soggy.

Fertilizing: Any full spectrum fertilizer at standard rates will keep the plant healthy and green.

Warning: Over fertilizing may result in tipburn. This is where the leaves of the Aloha Lily appear to be burned.

Dormancy: After blooming Aloha Lilies will continue to grow green foliage in order to store energy in the bulb for next year’s growth. In the beginning of fall, leaves will begin to turn yellow as the tuber begins its dormancy cycle. At this time discontinue watering and allow for the soil to dry out.

  • Bulbs in ground: Aloha Lilies can handle moderate frost. It is best to mulch areas where the ground will freeze.
  • Bulbs in containers: Aloha Lily bulbs grown in containers can easily rot. It is important to keep the bulbs dry throughout the winter. You can prevent the bulb from rotting by placing the containers against the eves of the house or in the garage. Containers can be placed back outside during spring time.

Bulbs in cold winters below USDA Zone 7:

  • Bulbs in ground: In areas where winters reach 10° F or colder dig up tubers. Keep bulbs dry in paper or mesh bags and protect them from freezing. Replant tubers in spring after the last freeze.
  • Bulbs in containers: It is ok to leave tubers in their pots if the soil is completely dry, store containers in a dry non-freezing area. Place containers outside and begin watering the pots the following spring after the last freeze.

Shop Aloha Lily Bulbs